Hip Bursitis Part 2: The Main Hip Bursitis Treatment Modalities

Hip Bursitis Part 2: The Main Hip Bursitis Treatment Modalities

If you’re suffering from hip bursitis, the first thing your chiropractor will likely recommend is to reduce your activity level. You may need to take a break from impact activities or sports altogether. If your job involves sitting for long periods of time, you may need to take some time off work as well. Once the pain and inflammation have subsided, you can gradually reintroduce activity into your life. It’s important not to overdo it, though. Pushing yourself too hard too soon can trigger a relapse.

In Part 1 of this series, we discussed the main hip bursitis symptoms and causes. As we move to Part 2, we will talk about how to treat hip bursitis and reduce its inflammation and pain.

What Causes Hip Bursitis?

Several factors can contribute to the development of hip bursitis. One of the most common is repetitive stress on the joint. This could be from a job that requires you to sit for long periods of time or from a sport that puts repeated stress on the hip joint. Age-related changes in the hip joint can also make you more susceptible to bursitis, such as loss of cartilage and changes in the shape of the joint.

Here are the leading causes of hip bursitis:

  • Repetitive motion and overuse;
  • Other conditions (e.g., scoliosis, arthritis, diabetes, gout, etc.);
  • Bacterial infection.

In the United States, 15% of women and 8.5% of men of all ages suffer from hip bursitis. Older and middle-aged individuals are more likely to suffer from this condition. Various factors can cause bursitis in the hip, but the most common is a repetitive activity, such as walking or running on uneven surfaces, which creates friction in the hip area.

Hip Bursitis Treatment

Exercises and stretches are usually prescribed for treating hip bursitis to help prevent muscle loss. Do not engage in activities that cause pain while you are recovering. Instead, speak to a chiropractor about exercises that can help you build strength around the injured area. If you have bursitis, you may be unable to perform daily activities properly. It may be necessary to undergo physical therapy to get you moving again. This is especially true if you’re suffering from chronic bursitis.

Nonsurgical Treatments for Hip Bursitis

Patients who suffer from hip bursitis can seek treatment from primary care providers, physiatrists (i.e., physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists), sports medicine doctors, and orthopedic surgeons. Specialists may recommend the following types of treatment:

Adapting Your Activity Level and Resting

Rest and other methods of treating hip bursitis often provide relief from inflammation caused by injury or overuse. However, sports and/or standing for long periods of time may aggravate and inflame the bursa in people suffering from hip bursitis. Furthermore, a health care provider may recommend using a cane, crutches, or shoe inserts to relieve pressure on the hip.

Ice

In sore hips, an ice or a cold pack can reduce localized pain and swelling. 

The Use of Topical Anti-inflammatory Medications

Over-the-counter pain relievers usually contain salicylates, which have a mild anti-inflammatory effect. Salicylate topical products include Sportscreme and Aspercreme. In general, topical medications have fewer side effects than oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, others may require a physician’s prescription.

Corticosteroid Injection

A corticosteroid injection may be recommended if symptoms cannot be treated effectively with rest, NSAIDs, and/or physical therapy. The doctor may use an ultrasound to precisely place the injection into the bursa because it lies deep beneath the skin.

Once the pain and inflammation of hip bursitis have subsided, you can gradually reintroduce activity into your life. It’s important not to overdo it, though. Pushing yourself too hard too soon can trigger a relapse. Here are some exercises that can help you safely ease back into activity:

  • Walking;
  • Swimming;
  • Cycling;
  • Stretching;
  • Hip-Strengthening exercises;
  • Pilates;
  • Yoga;
  • General conditioning exercises.

4 Stretches to Decrease Hip Bursitis Pain

Your doctor or physical therapist will probably tell you when to start and how often you should do your hip bursitis exercises. Generally, it is recommended to do the stretches two to three times a day and the exercises one to two times a day as tolerated. You will need a cushion or pillow, as well as a floor mat. Take your time when you first begin each exercise, and ease up if there is pain.

Here are the four stretches:

#1: Hip Rotator Stretch

  1. On your back, bend your knees and keep your feet flat on the floor.
  2. Your affected ankle should be placed on the opposite thigh, near your knee.
  3. Push your knee gently away from your body with your hand until you feel a gentle stretch at the front of your hip.
  4. You should hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds.

Repeat this stretch two to four times. Here’s a video tutorial on how to do this.

#2: Iliotibial Band Stretch

  1. Standing against a wall, place the affected hip against it. If you need extra support, grab a chair or something else that’s sturdy.
  2. Cross the other leg in front of your affected hip and put your weight on your affected hip.
  3. Put your arm above your head, on the same side as the affected hip.
  4. As you lean away from the wall, let your affected hip press against it until you feel a gentle stretch.
  5. For 15 to 30 seconds, hold the stretch.

Repeat this stretch two to four times. Here’s a video tutorial on how to do this.

#3: Straight-leg Raises

  1. Lying on your side, place the affected hip on top. Make sure to support your head and stabilize yourself if you need to. Grab a pillow if necessary.
  2. Keep your knee straight by tightening the muscles in your affected leg.
  3. Lift the leg that’s on top until your foot is about 12 inches away from the floor. 
  4. Make sure to always keep your hip and leg in line with the rest of your body. Keep everything straight.
  5. For six seconds, hold your leg in the raised position and slowly lower it.

Repeat this exercise eight to twelve times. Here’s a video tutorial on how to do this.

#4: Clamshell

  1. While lying on your side, place the affected hip on top. Be sure to support your head and stabilize yourself if you need to. If necessary, use a pillow.
  2. Bend both of your knees while keeping your legs together.
  3. Keeping your feet together, open your legs by lifting your top knee until your knees are about 8-10 inches apart. Make sure your top hip doesn’t roll back while doing each repetition.
  4. Hold your raised leg for six seconds, and then slowly lower your knee.
  5. Rest for 10 seconds before doing another repetition.

Repeat this exercise 8 to 12 times. Here’s a video tutorial on how to do this.

In general, hip bursitis heals by itself. The discomfort can usually be relieved through noninvasive measures, including rest, ice, and pain relievers. If these treatments don’t work, you may need to have fluid removed from the bursa, or you may need steroid shots to reduce swelling and pain.

Bursitis of the hip is rarely treated with surgery, which is used only when all other options have failed. When surgery is necessary, however, it is a simple procedure. Essentially, the bursa is removed from the hip, as it does not affect the hip’s function. The recovery period is generally brief and does not require an extended hospital stay.

Providing your hip joint with time to rest and heal is the best thing you can do if you suffer from hip bursitis. You can gradually get back to your routine once the pain and inflammation are gone.

We’re Looking Forward to Helping You at Our Chiropractic Offices in NJ!

At the Bergen Chiropractic and Sports Rehabilitation Center, our chiropractic team, led by Dr. Gregory Doerr, follows the highest and most professional medical standards to provide superior chiropractic help. After all, our mission is to provide unparalleled patient care and services in a comfortable healing atmosphere. Contact us to learn more about our chiropractic services! Our chiropractic offices in Cliffside Park, NJ, and Hackensack, NJ, are ready to welcome you!

Scoliosis Treatment Part 2: What are the Best Scoliosis Treatment Modalities?

Scoliosis Treatment Part 2: What are the Best Scoliosis Treatment Modalities?

In our previous blog post, we discussed the different types of scoliosis. In this blog post, we will be discussing the best scoliosis treatment modalities. There are many different ways to treat scoliosis, and it can be tricky to decide which treatment option is right for you. In addition, each treatment option for scoliosis has its own advantages and disadvantages. So, let’s take a look at some of the most common scoliosis treatment options!

What Causes Scoliosis?

Scoliosis is a progressive structural condition of the spine. When left untreated or neglected, this condition tends to worsen over time.

Furthermore, scoliosis is not a permanent condition: the form of scoliosis a patient experiences at the time of diagnosis has no impact on how or where it will remain in the future. People with mild scoliosis should be aware that, if left untreated, the disease can progress at varying rates of severity.

How Fast Does Scoliosis Progress?

Unfortunately, there is no hard and fast answer to the progress of scoliosis. Every case is different. Some spinal curves don’t progress at all after a certain point, while others progress very rapidly and continue to do so until action is taken.

 Here we will look at the most common form of scoliosis, which is called idiopathic scoliosis. Idiopathic scoliosis typically develops around the time the patient hits puberty, then progresses through their adolescence until their spine is fully developed (usually at the age of 16-18). It can be difficult to predict the rate of progression from one patient to the next, and a patient may stop growing before the scoliotic progression stops. Every case is different.

 Scoliosis comes in many forms, which further complicates things. Although the majority of cases of scoliosis are idiopathic (without a known cause), the condition can also be triggered by many other factors, including neuromuscular diseases and the aging process. Therefore, a great deal depends on the type of scoliosis you have and how fast your condition progresses (if indeed it does at all).

How to Treat Scoliosis

Scoliosis can be treated in several ways, depending on its severity. Here are some of the most common scoliosis treatments:

  • Assessment;
  • Physical therapy;
  • Chiropractic care;
  • Surgery.

#1: Assessment

A mild case of scoliosis may not require treatment; your doctor may opt just to monitor you. Your doctor will regularly monitor the progress of your scoliosis through regular consultations. Nonetheless, if your scoliosis is progressing, you may be required to explore other treatment options.

#2: Physical Therapy

Physical therapy is a standard treatment option in mild to moderate scoliosis cases. Physical therapy aims to increase flexibility, muscle strength, and range of motion in the spine. Additionally, it can help reduce the pain associated with scoliosis, which can also be relieved by traction and massage.

Exercises and chiropractic treatment are usually used in conjunction with physical therapy for scoliosis treatment.

#3: Chiropractic Care

One of the most popular treatments for scoliosis is chiropractic care. Chiropractors use various methods for realigning the spine and improving scoliotic curves. Spinal adjustments, manual manipulations, and electrical stimulation are the most common chiropractic techniques used in treating scoliosis.

#4: Braces

In many cases, bracing is recommended to prevent scoliosis from progressing in both children and adolescents. The most common kind of brace is made of plastic, contoured to the body, and typically worn during the day and removed at night. As the brace fits under the arms around the rib cage, lower back, and hips, it is virtually invisible under clothes.

The effectiveness of a brace increases with the number of hours it is worn per day. Generally, braces do not restrict children’s activities, who will be able to participate in most activities. Children can remove their braces for sports or other physical activities if necessary.

As long as your child’s bones are still growing and they have moderate scoliosis, a brace is recommended. Braces cannot cure scoliosis, but they can prevent it from worsening.

#5: Surgery

Surgery is typically recommended only for severe cases of scoliosis. There are two main types of surgery used to treat scoliosis: spinal fusion and vertebral segmentation. 

Spinal Fusion

Spinal fusion is the most common type of surgery used to treat scoliosis. It involves fusing the affected vertebrae in the spine. 

During this procedure, surgeons attach the vertebrae (i.e., spine bones) together so they cannot move independently. Next, a bone or material is placed between each vertebra. While the old and new bone material fuse together, metal rods, hooks, screws, or wires typically hold that spine section straight and still.

Vertebral Segmentation

Vertebral segmentation is a less common type of surgery used to treat scoliosis. It involves separating the affected vertebrae in the spine. 

It is possible to perform this operation through small incisions. An adjustment involves the placement of screws on the outside edge of the abnormal spinal curve and threading a strong, flexible cord through the screws. This process tightens the cord and straightens the spine. The spine can straighten even more as the child grows.

Why Should I See a Chiropractor for My Scoliosis Treatment?

Scoliosis is typically treated by surgery, but this is usually only performed on individuals with curves more than 50 degrees. In patients with less pronounced scoliosis, chiropractic care can be beneficial.

An individual with scoliosis can seek the help of a chiropractor to prevent the condition from getting worse and better manage symptoms. Furthermore, chiropractors provide non-invasive and drug-free treatments for scoliosis patients that restore alignment to the spine in order to promote their bodies’ natural healing process.

We’re Looking Forward to Helping You at Our Chiropractic Offices in NJ!

At the Bergen Chiropractic and Sports Rehabilitation Center, our chiropractic team, led by Dr. Gregory Doerr, follows the highest and most professional medical standards to provide superior chiropractic help. After all, our mission is to provide unparalleled patient care and services in a comfortable healing atmosphere. Contact us to learn more about our chiropractic services! Our chiropractic offices in Cliffside Park, NJ, and Hackensack, NJ, are ready to welcome you!

Chiropractor vs. Physiotherapist: Why is a Chiropractor a Superior Choice?

Chiropractor vs. Physiotherapist: Why is a Chiropractor a Superior Choice?

Keeping our bodies healthy doesn’t require just eating healthy foods and staying away from harmful habits. Sometimes, all we need is to treat the pain and stiffness of our bodies with a session of physical therapy or chiropractic care. But how should we choose between chiropractors and physical therapists? 

What Does a Physical Therapist Do?

Before choosing between physical therapy and chiropractic care, you first have to learn about the two practices and their differences. A physical therapist treats body disorders affecting the musculoskeletal, neurological, and integumentary systems. After a thorough physical examination, a physical therapist can create a treatment plan consisting of exercising, a hands-on approach to treatment techniques, and stretching. The goal of the treatment is to alleviate pain in specific body areas and restore their utility as much as possible. Physical therapists can specialize in numerous focus areas such as oncology, orthopedics, pediatrics, and many more. 

Are Chiropractors and Physical Therapists the Same?

Physical therapists and chiropractors may seem similar because both physical therapists and chiropractors are medical professionals who focus on treating pain and stiffness in the body. But they are not the same. The approaches they use are the primary way to differentiate the two professions. 

 Physical therapy aims to treat the body’s restricted movement and its entire functions. On the other hand, chiropractic care’s primary focus is issues regarding back pain, neck pain, joint pain, and even headaches. Also, physical therapy focuses on achieving pain-free movement for the patient, while chiropractic care relieves pain in the spine. 

The approaches of physiotherapy and chiropractic care are entirely different. For example, physical therapists use the help of exercises, stretches, and diverse manipulations to improve the body’s mobility. Meanwhile, chiropractors use various noninvasive treatment methods such as spinal manipulations to help the body heal itself. 

The environments in which physical therapists and chiropractors work are not alike. While chiropractors need specialized spaces with special equipment to execute adjustments, physical therapists can work at home or in any healthcare environment. 

How Do Chiropractors and Physical Therapists Differ Education-Wise?

Both physical therapists and chiropractors need a higher level of education. Chiropractors must have a bachelor’s degree, attend a particular chiropractic school, obtain a Doctor of Chiropractic degree, and, in the end, pass an exam that will ensure them a state license. This entire process lasts eight years.

On the other hand, physical therapists have to pass the National Physical Therapy Examination after attending a Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Compared to chiropractic care, the physical therapy journey takes about seven years to complete. 

Is Chiropractic Care Better Than Physical Therapy?

Chiropractic Treatment is Better at Addressing Neck Pain 

If you search for a quick way to treat your neck problems, the answer is to contact a chiropractor. Chiropractic care will treat your neck and back problems and adjust your mobility much quicker than physical therapy. The results are immediate, and you won’t have to visit your chiropractor too often. Physical therapists will require you to exercise for an extended period and make changes in your diet for results to show.

Chiropractic Care is Better at Healing the Musculoskeletal and Nervous Systems

Chiropractic care mainly focuses on the treatment options of musculoskeletal system and nervous system disorders. This is why chiropractic care is better than physical therapy when talking about this subject. Physical therapy focuses on the body as a whole and will not decrease pain levels instantly. People visit a chiropractor even if they are not experiencing pain to improve their overall health.

Chiropractic Care and Immediate Pain Relief 

Indeed, chiropractic care will ease your pain immediately. This is why many people recommend chiropractic care rather than physical therapy. By adjusting and manipulating different areas of your body, a chiropractic treatment session can decrease pain in just a session. As a result, chiropractic care sessions will be fewer and shorter than a physical therapy treatment plan.

Who is Better at Addressing Joint Pain? 

Physical therapy focuses on restoring the mobility and function of the body. This discipline aims to strengthen your body and suggest ways to avoid pain and other injuries. On the other hand, chiropractic care treats conditions like joint pain in the arms and legs. This is the chiropractor’s prime goal, to ease the pain and treat disorders of the joints, neck, and spine. 

Who is Better at Performing a Spinal Adjustment?

Spinal adjustments are also known as chiropractic adjustments, so you can only guess whom to choose here. This procedure aims to improve spinal motion and the body’s physical function using spinal manipulation. The chiropractor uses their hands or instrument to apply sudden force on the spinal joint. People experiencing low back pain, headaches, and neck pain are usually the standard clientele for spinal adjustment. 

Chiropractic Care is Ideal for Sports Injuries

Athletes are known to frequent the chiropractor’s office. Because athletes force and work their bodies more often than ordinary people, chiropractors can help relieve pain in overworked muscles. An experienced chiropractor will quickly find the sports injury and treat it without any problem. Besides the immediate pain relief, chiropractic care doesn’t make use of more invasive treatments and doesn’t require medication or drugs. Also, athletes who frequent the chiropractor have increased flexibility, which means they are less likely to get injured. 

We’re Looking Forward to Helping You at Our Chiropractic Offices in NJ!

At the Bergen Chiropractic and Sports Rehabilitation Center, our chiropractic team, led by Dr. Gregory Doerr, follows the highest and most professional medical standards to provide superior chiropractic help. After all, our mission is to provide unparalleled patient care and services in a comfortable healing atmosphere. Contact us to learn more about our chiropractic services! Our chiropractic offices in Cliffside Park, NJ, and Hackensack, NJ, are ready to welcome you!

Patellar Tracking Disorder Part 2: What are the Best Patellar Tracking Disorder Treatment Modalities?

Patellar Tracking Disorder Part 2: What are the Best Patellar Tracking Disorder Treatment Modalities?

Patellar tracking disorder means a painful knee joint injury that can cause severe pain and various knee problems. Depending on the extent of the injury, you may need extra knee support, strengthening exercises, or even orthopedic surgery. It can be brought on by muscle weakness, too much force, repetitive motion, or various other causes. 

In Part 1 of our patellar tracking disorder series, we explored the condition and its causes. Here in Part 2, we will discuss options for how patellar tracking disorder is treated and how to get rid of the knee joint pain.

But first, let’s do a brief review of the condition. 

Kneecap Recap: Patellar Tracking Disorder

The patella, or kneecap, is located atop a layer of cartilage and moves along a groove at the end of the femur. Your knee becomes susceptible to injury if exposed to excessive or repetitive forces. 

With patellar tracking disorder, the patella is pushed out of the femur groove and moves toward the outside of the leg. Patellar tracking disorder can also be caused by leg muscle weakness, too tight or loose tendons, aging, and excessive weight. 

Patellar Tracking Disorder Symptoms

Patellar tracking disorder symptoms include knee pain, severe pain, and swelling in the front of the knee. The pain intensifies when you apply pressure as you run, jump, or use stairs. You may feel your knee pop, grind, slip, or buckle. In severe cases, the knee may be completely dislocated.

How is Patellar Tracking Disorder Treated?

Several home remedies are available for patients who are not experiencing severe pain:

  1. Refrain from stressful activities, such as running, jumping, and kneeling.
  2. Ice your knee, and try heat after a few days.
  3. Use over-the-counter pain relievers as directed.

Once the pain decreases, you can start exercises to strengthen the knee. 

Sometimes, more extensive treatment is needed. At Bergen Chiropractic and Sports Rehabilitation Center, we use evidence-based techniques to relieve the symptoms and stabilize the area. After assessing the injury, we select soft tissue techniques that will address your specific condition. 

Graston Technique

This clinically proven Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM) technique uses stainless steel tools to detect and break down scarring. 

Active Release Technique (ART)

This movement-based technique treats restrictions in muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and nerves. We combine directionally specific soft tissue contacts with several tissue-selective movement patterns.

FAKTR (Functional and Kinetic Treatment with Rehabilitation, Provocation, and Motion)

FAKTR combines soft tissue treatments, resistance training, and exercises to produce fast results. FAKTR, developed by Dr. Gregory Doerr, DC at Bergen Chiropractic, and Thomas E Hyde, DC, reboots the nervous system, increases the proliferation of healing cells, remodels injured tissues, and directs blood flow to the injured area to reduce swelling and bruising.

Patellar Tracking Disorder Exercises

Gentle strengthening exercises help ease knee pain and strengthen the surrounding muscles. 

#1: Quadricep Contractions

  • Sit up against a back support. 
  • Straighten one knee and bend the other. 
  • In the straight leg, tighten the quadriceps and hold it for five seconds. 

#2: Wall Slides

  • For wall slides, stand with your back against a wall. 
  • Gradually bend your knees and slide down the wall until your knees are at a 45-degree angle. 
  • Hold for five seconds, then slide back up. 

#3: Straight-Leg Raises to the Front, Inside, Outside, and Back

The straight-leg raise helps increase the range of motion. 

  • Lie on your back. 
  • Bend your uninjured leg’s knee and place the foot flat on the floor. 
  • Contract the quadriceps of the injured leg, and lift it about six inches. 
  • Hold for a few seconds, and slowly lower the leg to the floor. 
  • To the front, lift your leg straight up. 
  • To the inside, lift your leg across your body. 
  • To the outside, lift it away from your body. 
  • To the back, lie on your stomach and lift your leg.

#4: Shallow Standing Knee Bends

  • Hold on to a chair or sturdy object in front of you. 
  • Bend your knees and squat about six inches. 
  • Keep your heels on the floor. 
  • Raise back up to stand. 

Can a Knee Brace Ameliorate My Patellar Tracking Disorder?

While exercises help restore your knee and surrounding tissues to their proper location and function, you may also need some additional support. For example, a knee brace wraps around the area and keeps your knee bones in place and your patella from shifting.  

Knee Taping for Patellar Tracking Disorder

Taping techniques developed by Bergen Chiropractic’s Dr. Gregory Doerr, DC, stabilize the injured tissues, prevent further strain, and promote faster healing. 

  • Kinesio Taping tapes over and around the injured area, reducing pain, improving muscular function, decreasing swelling and bruising, and allowing full range of motion.
  • SpiderTech Tape integrates with the body’s nervous system, decreasing pain perception, preventing an injurious range of motion, and sweeping away chemical irritants and swelling. 
  • Specific Proprioceptive Response Taping (SPRT) supports injury healing while allowing a proper range of motion. 
  • Functional Taping is Dr. Doerr’s signature method. His testing procedure provides evidence on which to determine whether taping is necessary and which techniques will produce results.

Can Orthopedic Surgery Help?

While most patients don’t need surgery, it may be required if other treatments have failed or your knee is dislocated. Two surgery options are available for patients, both of which can be performed through arthroscopy: 

  • Cutting the ligaments that hold the patella in place.
  • Repairing the ligament that keeps the patella from moving outward.

How to Prevent Patellar Tracking Disorder

If you want to prevent patellar tracking disorder, you can lower your risks by employing the following tips:

  • Avoid putting excessive force and reduce stress on your knees: This may be difficult for athletes and people with physically demanding jobs. 
  • Get or stay in good physical shape: Exercises that strengthen leg muscles are the way to go!
  • Lose excess weight: Your knees support about 80% of your weight when standing still and 150% when walking. You will ease the strain on your knee bones by excess weight.

We’re Looking Forward to Helping You at Our Chiropractic Offices in NJ!

Patellar tracking disorder can be quite painful, but fortunately, patients can relieve their knee pain without orthopedic surgery. At Bergen Chiropractic and Sports Rehabilitation Center, our soft tissue treatments and taping techniques provide thorough healing without surgery or medications. 

At the Bergen Chiropractic and Sports Rehabilitation Center, our chiropractic team, led by Dr. Gregory Doerr, follows the highest and most professional medical standards to provide superior chiropractic help. After all, our mission is to provide unparalleled patient care and services in a comfortable healing atmosphere. Contact us to learn more about our chiropractic services! Our chiropractic offices in Cliffside Park, NJ, and Hackensack, NJ, are ready to welcome you!

Scoliosis Treatment Part 1: What Are the Main Scoliosis Types?

Scoliosis Treatment Part 1: What Are the Main Scoliosis Types?

Scoliosis is a spinal deformity that causes abnormal curvatures in the spine. Many of the younger population live with scoliosis, from infants to teenagers. And while scoliosis tends to be associated with children, it can also affect adults. 

According to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), scoliosis impacts 2-3% of the American population – that’s six to nine million individuals with irregular spine curvatures! However, these folks aren’t suffering from only one type of scoliosis. Several kinds of scoliosis are classified by its cause, the patient’s age during the first onset, and its progression rate. So, let’s discuss what these different types of scoliosis are and how to recognize their symptoms.

What Are the Main Types of Scoliosis?

There are four main types of scoliosis determined by the age of onset and its cause.

#1: Congenital Scoliosis

Congenital scoliosis is a rare condition that affects only 1 in 10,000 newborns. The spinal deformity develops in the womb and lingers after birth. A malformation in the spine of the developing fetus is typically the most common cause of congenital scoliosis. 

Because congenital scoliosis happens inside the womb, it is diagnosed earlier than the other types of scoliosis. Some symptoms of congenital scoliosis are:

  • Tilted and uneven shoulders;
  • Prominent ribs on one side;
  • Uneven waistline;
  • One hip is higher than the other;
  • Tilted head;
  • The appearance of the body leaning to one side.

In rare cases, there may be a problem with the newborn’s spinal cord and nerves, which can cause weakness and loss of coordination. Diagnostic tests like EOS imaging, x-rays, CT scans, and MRIs are advised to further investigate the condition. Then, a suitable treatment plan such as surgery can be performed by a physician. 

#2: Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

Idiopathic scoliosis has no official known cause. However, the most common type, adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, could be due to the sudden growth spurt during adolescence. As many as 4 out of 100 children between the ages of 10 and 18 develop idiopathic scoliosis. 

As spinal growth begins to speed up after age 10, the curvature of the spine may be affected, leading to the following symptoms:

  • Uneven shoulders;
  • Uneven waistline;
  • One shoulder blade is more prominent than the other;
  • One hip is higher than the other;
  • One side of the rib cage protrudes forward;
  • One side of the back is more prominent when bending forward.

While the actual cause of idiopathic scoliosis is still unknown, many researchers continue to develop theories and study the root of this condition. Some researchers suggest a genetic link or a hormonal imbalance to be the cause of idiopathic scoliosis. 

#3: Neuromuscular Scoliosis

Neuromuscular scoliosis is a secondary condition caused by other disorders like muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and other neuromuscular conditions. This type of scoliosis can be seen in individuals who use wheelchairs. 

Neuromuscular scoliosis occurs when brain neurons cannot communicate properly with the muscles. The curvature usually progresses into adulthood and becomes more severe in patients who can no longer walk. These individuals who use wheelchairs may have difficulty sitting upright and tend to slouch to one side. 

Some of the underlying conditions that lead to neuromuscular scoliosis are:

The first sign of neuromuscular scoliosis in individuals is a change in posture. For example, they may be leaning too forward or too sidewards when standing up or sitting down. Thankfully, this scoliosis type is not painful unless it progresses into a severe abnormal curvature. 

#4: Degenerative Scoliosis

Degenerative scoliosis, also called adult-onset scoliosis or de novo scoliosis, develops when aging causes joints and discs in the spine to deteriorate. The wear and tear of these joints connecting spinal vertebrae can cause spinal curvature to become more pronounced on one side. It’s been estimated that 68% or more of people past 60 years old have at least mild degenerative scoliosis.

Degenerative scoliosis develops in the lumbar spine or the lower back and forms a minute C-shape. Compared to the other types of scoliosis, degenerative scoliosis can become the most painful. Other degenerative scoliosis symptoms include: 

  • Dull lower back pain; 
  • Muscle fatigue;
  • Radiating pain that runs down the leg;
  • Sharp pain in the leg while walking.

Over time, people with degenerative scoliosis may lose balance on top of their poor posture. Therefore, older individuals with this scoliosis type must see a physician immediately to undergo the proper treatment.

Can I See a Chiropractor for My Scoliosis? 

The typical course of treatment for straightening scoliosis is surgery – but this is often reserved for individuals with curvatures beyond 50 degrees. Scoliotic individuals with less prominent curvatures can seek chiropractic care to treat their condition.

Seeking help from professional chiropractors can help prevent scoliosis from getting worse and manage the symptoms to improve an individual’s quality of life. In addition, chiropractors can provide a non-invasive and drug-free treatment plan for scoliotic patients and allow their bodies to heal themselves by restoring proper alignment to their spine.

We’re Looking Forward to Helping You at Our Chiropractic Offices in NJ!

At the Bergen Chiropractic and Sports Rehabilitation Center, our chiropractic team, led by Dr. Gregory Doerr, follows the highest and most professional medical standards to provide superior chiropractic help. After all, our mission is to provide unparalleled patient care and services in a comfortable healing atmosphere. Contact us to learn more about our chiropractic services! Our chiropractic offices in Cliffside Park, NJ, and Hackensack, NJ, are ready to welcome you!